Oshio Beni Japanese Maple

Acer palmatum ‘Oshio Beni’

Oshio Beni is a considered a favorite upright tree among Japanese maple enthusiasts.  With a maximum height of 15′ or so it doesn’t grow quite as tall as other upright rights.   Spring color is red with a hint of orange but quickly deepen to a deep purple.  It holds it color pretty well through the season taking on a little green by the end of summer.  But as soon as fall rolls in the leaves turn a strking red and they hold that color all through fall until they drop.

Seeds from Oshio Beni tend to produce seedlings with good red color.

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This tree is happiest in zones 5 through 8 and should be planted in well drained soil that is high in organic matter.  This tree is a great choice if you desire that deep red color.

Acer palmatum Oshio Beni

Acer palmatum Oshio Beni

 

Acer palmatum Oshio Beni

Acer palmatum Oshio Beni

 

Japanese Maple Oshio Beni

Japanese Maple Oshio Beni

 

Japanese Maple Oshio Beni

Japanese Maple Oshio Beni

 

Japanese Maple Oshio Beni

Japanese Maple Oshio Beni

Wanted!  People Who Would Like to Get Paid for Growing
Small Plants at Home  Click here.

 

11 thoughts on “Oshio Beni Japanese Maple

  1. Arlene Wood on said:

    I love the big leaves and deep red color. Would love to have one, but I live in the Mojave Desert. The temperature here goes from 118 – 20′s not sure if this plant will survive. Please let me know if this variety will survive or a vanity that looks similar to this one.

  2. Becky Sewell on said:

    Mike, how fast do these trees grow – how old is that shrubby little guy? I picked up a bunch of seeds from several different red-leafed Jap maples last fall, stuck them in snack-bags in the fridge with some damp soil, and am wondering how long I’ll have to wait to get a few NICE-sized multi-trunk trees like this one. I love the structure of the Japs so much more than the various American maples – they look like they came out of a Japanese-style painting. I’m also pondering how well a backyard nursery will do in my yard – it’s full of black walnut trees! I’ve read that maples succumb to the juglone given off by the walnuts. We rent, so I can’t cut them down…..

    • Mike on said:

      Becky, the Oshio Beni in the photo is probably about 40 years old. That’s my guess. A good way to test your backyard for a nursery is to grow out those seedlings from your seeds and see how well they do.

  3. Penelope Putnam on said:

    Will this maple make it in the central valley of California? I think we are area 9.

    • Mike on said:

      Penelope, I’m not sure, that’s pushing the zones a little. We’ll have an article soon about Japanese Maples for warmer climates.

  4. growerplanter on said:

    I am waiting for an order of Japanese Maple seeds to arrive from the seed rack, both varieties are weeping, I really want to do some grafting and selling. What are some other sources for seeds and seedlings?
    Z6 Meridian,ID

    • Mike on said:

      Kevin, I’d start looking locally for deep red Japanese maples trees that you can collect seeds from this fall. When you really start paying attention in your local area you’ll spot trees that you’ve never noticed before. I say that because you really want fresh seeds. When you buy seeds from a retail source you never really know what you are getting for sure. In our group we have a couple of members that sell fresh seed in the all. We also have members that sell all kinds of rare Japanese maples for really low prices. I mean really low. I highly recommend that find some fresh seed just so you are not dissapointed. I have a detailed article on this site about growing Japanese Maples from seed, make sure you print it out. http://freeplants.com/wanted.htm

  5. Janet on said:

    I bought a japanese maple in a 15 gallon container. It is 8 ft. tall. I want to plant it in a permanent container. I plan to keep it trimed to 10 ft. What size of container do I need? Diameter & depth. Drainage holes? Does the container need to be somewhat in the ground? I live in zone 7.

    • Mike on said:

      Janet,

      For each one inch of tree caliper, measured six inches off the ground, you should have at least 18″ of container diameter. But also allow for the tree to grow. In your zone the tree would be just fine in a container, but I really think it would be much happier in the ground.

  6. Deep on said:

    I live in Canadian Zone 5-6 (downtown Toronto near the lake) and want to plant a Japanese Maple on the rooftop of our building. Its only about 12 stories off the ground but obviously gets exposed to direct sun for most of the day. To complicate things they would be planted in the center of 5x5x5′ planters spaced 10′ apart and then filled with plants around them. (see website)

    I really want an alternating green and bright red combination like Fireglow or Oshio Beni and Pink Lace but realize they probably won’t be able to take the rooftop climate.

    Any ideas? I’m stuck…

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